Tag: TweetDeck

We recently completed a globally-focused 10-day social media campaign for one of our clients which resulted in over 1,300 new Twitter followers, overwhelmingly positive Twitter sentiment and also generated over 250 new Facebook fans and traffic to the company’s website and blog.

Here are a few of the basics I used to get up the campaign, manage it, and measure it.

Benchmarks:  Before your first Tweet, make sure to take note of of how many people are already following you on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn (groups, etc.) so you can compare the before-and-after scenario.

Identifying goals:  While it’s easy to see the hard results – did your numbers go up or down – there’s more to social media metrics than hard numbers.  Sentiment is hard to quantify, but it’s easy to see.  In our campaign, one day we asked people to tell us why they liked what our client was doing.  We received such a great response – comments that were creative, funny, and inspiring.  Of course, you also open yourself up for negative commentary, but in our experience, we have found the community to be collaborative and supportive.  When a snarky comment did appear on another day, the community came to the defense.  A perfect validation of why it’s important to maintain an open dialogue and relationship with the community.

Tone of Voice: For our particular exercise, the voice we used for Tweeting was humorous, approachable and a bit irreverent.  We decided to use this tone as it not only caught the attention of the community but also made people smile, question, and comment.  It was in sync with the client’s brand and messaging.  All elements of the communication – from the press release, to the blog, to the Twitter feed, to the YouTube video, to the Facebook fan page and more reflected upon one another and carried this voice.

Once we had our basics down, then began the work.

We used a variety of free tools to make our job easier, as we provided daily reports on metrics, sentiment, and milestones (by the way, I did try out a couple of paid services, but I found I could gather the same information without paying the subscription fees).  Here are the tools we used:

Tweetdeck:  Tweetdeck’s desktop client was the hub of my Twitter communications.  I set up a few different search columns to make sure I had visibility into all sides of the conversation.  One column was dedicated to the hashtag we used, anothers to particular search terms, and of course others for @ replies and DMs.

Seesmic Web app:  I also used Seemic’s web app as it provided a cleaner and easier way for me to view responses and had a deeper historical view, which was important to me as we were managing this campaign across all time zones (i.e. 24 hours a day).

TwitterCounter:  A great chart that shows how many followers you have today, how many more you just accrued, and how many are predicted to come in a day more more.

Trendrr:  More useful charts and information on the number of mentions on Twitter, blogs, and search engines.

SocialOomph:  When you want to get your message out at 8:00AM in London but you’re based in San Francisco which is 8 hours behind, there’s an alternative to staying awake late or asking your colleagues in London to take on the task for you (assuming you have colleagues in London).  This is where SocialOomph comes in.  You can preschedule a Tweet to go out on a specific date/time.  It’s a great thing to use occassionally, but I don’t advocate you use it often, as the whole point of social media is the conversation, which means you have to have a real-live human on the both ends.

Another analytic tool I did not use during this last campaign but am considering for the future is SocialMention which provides a nice snapshot of all the social media elements you can imagine.

At the end of the campaign, it was gratifying and satisfying to see the upward trend of followers, the collection of great Tweets and comments from the community, and the impact on other social media touchpoints.  We embraced the community to share and ReTweet our news, tips, and were thrilled to see our messages amplified.


Last Friday, I flew from San Francisco to Seattle to celebrate my mom’s 85th birthday with her.  She’s got quite a sweet tooth and a distinct fondness for chocolate cake, but packing a cake into your carry-on isn’t exactly the easiest thing to do so I decided instead to rely on her favorite restaurant to insert a candle in her dessert.

Upon landing in Seattle-Tacoma Airport, I pulled out my BlackBerry and mindlessly Tweeted about our arrival and the plan to celebrate with my mom.  I immediately got a Tweet back from @odettedaniello with a link to her bakery, Celebrity Cake Studio.

I had not heard of Celebrity Cake Studio before and wasn’t planning on buying a birthday cake in Tacoma, but Odette’s Tweet made me realize that Twitter can serendipitously answer your requests – even when you weren’t really expecting an answer.

I ended up tweeting with her and arrived at her studio the next day to purchase my mom’s cake.  My mom was chuffed at the delicious three-layer chocolate cake with chocolate mousse filling and I was thrilled to support a local Tacoma business.  With a simple Tweet, Odette alerted me to her business, lured me in with her concise and enthusiastic messages, and got a new customer for life.  New business was as easy as writing about a piece of cake!

I use TweetDeck to monitor various key phrases and our client names so I always know when they are subjects of discussion.  It keeps me posted on sentiments, news and rumors in real-time.  For anyone conducting business on Twitter, I recommend you search for key phrases relevant to your business and monitor these search queries for messages of praise, concern and/or need.  It provides a direct line to current and future customers and provides a wonderful channel of dialogue.

And if you’re in Tacoma and need a great cake, please do visit Odette and say hi.

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Image of Tweeting Bird from Twitter

I’ve had a few people ask me how to get more Twitter followers and what apps I use. I have to spend some time thinking about how to word my condensed answer on how to get Twitter followers – I don’t have zillions of followers, so I’m a bit relunctant to say I know anything special, but I do have a few, so I guess I must have done a couple of things “right” along the way (or I just got lucky, which is probably a lot of it). In the meantime, here are a few things I’ve been using and Tweeting about:

TweetDeck

  • Pros: When you start following a lot of people, it’s hard to spot some of those special Tweeters you really want to keep up on. With TweetDeck, you can create a special column filled only with those special peeps. I also use it to search for the names of our clients so I can monitor the chatter about them.
  • Cons: It occassionally dramatically slows the performance of my PC and even crashes it. I’m also sometimes annoyed by their data limits – once you hit then the windows won’t refresh for a while.

Twitpic

If you use Tweetdeck, Twitpic is incorporated into the functionality.  You can link your Tweet with a photo – and with only 140 characters to use, it’s nice to allow your picture to tell your story because a “picture is worth a 1000 words” and Twitter is only a bumper sticker.

  • Pros:  Easy to upload and share photos.  Also allows sharing, blogging and comments.
  • Cons:  It’s supposed to work seamlessly with TwitterBerry, but it never works.

TwitterBerry

I’m a BlackBerry user, so TwitterBerry is my mobile app.  You can Tweet within the app and save SMS charges and you can also see replies and direct messages and reply back in an easy-to-use format.

  • Pros:  Simple interface and superb mobile convenience.
  • Cons:  The aforementioned Twitpic problem (not a big deal) and you constantly have to refresh to see what’s new.

TwitterSearch

Well, the name explains it all – enter your keyword, get results.

Twitter Grader – Location

Want to see who’s Tweeting near you?  Enter your city and you’ll see the top Twits in your locale.  Interesting but I do admit I felt a bit voyeuristic too.

Twitter Balloon

See that little Twitter widget to the right, with my pic in it?  That’s from Korelab and it’s a Twitter balloon.  It’s not the easiest to configure, but the instructions are in the blog and I like that it’s a bit more visual than the other Twitter widgets I’ve seen.

SocialToo

I used to get an email every time somebody followed me, but because my inbox is also inundated with Russian spam, I decided to eliminate anything extraneous.  I now get a once-a-day summary email from SocialToo that tells me who followed me (and which one of my Tweets was where they began to follow) and who drops me (and which Tweet bored them to tears).

PowerTwitter

This Firefox add-in cleans up the regular Twitter interface.  After you load it up and go to the normal www.twitter.com site, you’ll see photos and video thumbnails, plus links presented in a much nicer format.  Plus, the company behind this is from Marin – yo!