Tag: social media

I thought this was a great chart illustrating the evolving nature of social CRM, as it also identifies the importance and growing prominence of PR as touchpoint and means to establish a two-way communication with the consumer.

I’ve been following a Runner’s World plan to run a sub 4 hour marathon for the past 14 weeks, as I made it into the ING New York Marathon via the lottery system (first time I applied – beginner’s luck!).

I’ve been testing out a variety of apps and gadgets to help keep me on track and motivated.

Here is my list of mission critical tools for runner’s who also enjoy technology:

  1. Garmin Forerunner 305 GPS Watch: I love this thing and can’t live without it.  It keeps track of my distance, laps, time, pace, and more.  I also have the accompaning heart rate monitor, but I don’t use that.  Instead, I rely on my watch to keep track of the stats I care about, and then upload them into my PC after each run so I can see how I’m progressing.  I also use it to input key data into DailyMile (more on that later).
  2. Nike Boom: I love the audible motivations (or, what they call “Attaboys”) this iPhone app delivers into my ear.  While it’s geared for atheletes playing football, basketball, or hockey, I enjoy the variety of players and coaches from around the US that tell you things like “This ain’t about being flashy. Aint no second chances up a hill. Aint no do overs either.  You know what time it is?  It’s time to leave nothing!” from DeSean Jackson.
  3. Nike+:  Pre-installed on my iPhone 3GS, this app also provides audibles letting you know how far you’ve run.  It’s not as accurate as the Garmin device, but I do like to hear the mile markers in my ear, and also like the countdown at the end, starting at 400 meters to go.  When you’ve reached a major milestone, you’ll also be treated to Lance Armstrong, Paula Radcliffe or other sporting superstars offering you congratulations.  Awesome!
  4. DailyMile:  It’s like Facebook for runners.  You can upload your workout data from your Garmin or Nike+, or input it manually.  Then you can see how other runners have fared and leave comments and motivations.  I have a small group of peeps I’ve been following and have derived inspiration – some are running the NYC Marathon as well, so maybe I’ll even meet them in person.
  5. Facebook:  Using DailyMile to populate my status update on Facebook (and Twitter), I’ve had my spirits lifted and my confidence bouyed by friends who have seen my log come through the airwaves.  I’ve even had my cousin Sheila’s second grade class give me some good vibes through a Get Well Dance during recess.  Now that’s some serious motivation!
  6. Twitter:  As mentioned above, when my DailyMile stats are Tweeted, I often get feedback from some of my Twitter friends giving me kudos or advise. I’m also now keeping track of the conversations about the marathon by watching the official hashtag #ingnycm

Now if there were only an app that would heal my cranky ITB, I’d be in business…

Posted via email from Consort Partners

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I recently went to my local sushi restaurant and was compelled to “check in” via Foursquare. While location-based services such as Foursquare and Gowalla are igniting big cities across America, it’s a rare occasion to see anyone else “checked in” to a location spot here in Marin (just north of San Francisco).  On this evening though, I did see that another Foursquare member had checked in a few minutes before me, and as I looked at his profile picture, I was able to spot him sitting at the sushi bar. That was kinda cool.

The game of “checking in” is a fun way to promote your whereabouts and snoop on what your friends are doing, but the flurry of location-based services have yet to deliver real value on my local community and surroundings. With DeHood, the game has fundamentally changed.

Imagine preparing for a run at “The Dish” near Palo Alto, a scenic area of rolling grassy hills and oak trees.  You pull up DeHood, click “Reports” and see members reporting that a mountain lion has been spotted and the area has consequently been closed. In the “Shouts” tab, members are lamenting the wintery weather we’re experiencing in the Bay Area and adding comments to posts.  And in the “places” tab, I discover there are so many more businesses around me than I ever knew, as the content in DeHood is pre-populated from local directory services and with one click, I can call any of them from my mobile phone.

Another nice feature is “Shop” which aggregates deals from local and chain stores in my neighborhood. In fact, I just discovered Peet’s is offering $200 off an espresso machine – I can see the image of the machine, share the offer with others, check out the profile of the person who discovered/input the offer, and more.

There are times when it’s fun to know that my friends in London or NY or Tacoma might be checking in to In ‘N Out Burger, but it’s tangibly relevant for me to know what’s happening in my city, neighborhood, or street on a daily basis.

Location, location, location is not only important in real estate.  That triple location emphasis is where neighborhood-based services really shine

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We recently completed a globally-focused 10-day social media campaign for one of our clients which resulted in over 1,300 new Twitter followers, overwhelmingly positive Twitter sentiment and also generated over 250 new Facebook fans and traffic to the company’s website and blog.

Here are a few of the basics I used to get up the campaign, manage it, and measure it.

Benchmarks:  Before your first Tweet, make sure to take note of of how many people are already following you on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn (groups, etc.) so you can compare the before-and-after scenario.

Identifying goals:  While it’s easy to see the hard results – did your numbers go up or down – there’s more to social media metrics than hard numbers.  Sentiment is hard to quantify, but it’s easy to see.  In our campaign, one day we asked people to tell us why they liked what our client was doing.  We received such a great response – comments that were creative, funny, and inspiring.  Of course, you also open yourself up for negative commentary, but in our experience, we have found the community to be collaborative and supportive.  When a snarky comment did appear on another day, the community came to the defense.  A perfect validation of why it’s important to maintain an open dialogue and relationship with the community.

Tone of Voice: For our particular exercise, the voice we used for Tweeting was humorous, approachable and a bit irreverent.  We decided to use this tone as it not only caught the attention of the community but also made people smile, question, and comment.  It was in sync with the client’s brand and messaging.  All elements of the communication – from the press release, to the blog, to the Twitter feed, to the YouTube video, to the Facebook fan page and more reflected upon one another and carried this voice.

Once we had our basics down, then began the work.

We used a variety of free tools to make our job easier, as we provided daily reports on metrics, sentiment, and milestones (by the way, I did try out a couple of paid services, but I found I could gather the same information without paying the subscription fees).  Here are the tools we used:

Tweetdeck:  Tweetdeck’s desktop client was the hub of my Twitter communications.  I set up a few different search columns to make sure I had visibility into all sides of the conversation.  One column was dedicated to the hashtag we used, anothers to particular search terms, and of course others for @ replies and DMs.

Seesmic Web app:  I also used Seemic’s web app as it provided a cleaner and easier way for me to view responses and had a deeper historical view, which was important to me as we were managing this campaign across all time zones (i.e. 24 hours a day).

TwitterCounter:  A great chart that shows how many followers you have today, how many more you just accrued, and how many are predicted to come in a day more more.

Trendrr:  More useful charts and information on the number of mentions on Twitter, blogs, and search engines.

SocialOomph:  When you want to get your message out at 8:00AM in London but you’re based in San Francisco which is 8 hours behind, there’s an alternative to staying awake late or asking your colleagues in London to take on the task for you (assuming you have colleagues in London).  This is where SocialOomph comes in.  You can preschedule a Tweet to go out on a specific date/time.  It’s a great thing to use occassionally, but I don’t advocate you use it often, as the whole point of social media is the conversation, which means you have to have a real-live human on the both ends.

Another analytic tool I did not use during this last campaign but am considering for the future is SocialMention which provides a nice snapshot of all the social media elements you can imagine.

At the end of the campaign, it was gratifying and satisfying to see the upward trend of followers, the collection of great Tweets and comments from the community, and the impact on other social media touchpoints.  We embraced the community to share and ReTweet our news, tips, and were thrilled to see our messages amplified.